Building families through donated embryos

F.A.Q.

At Midwest Fertility Specialists, we realize that you may have many questions about embryo donation. These are a few of the most common questions, but if you have additional questions or concerns please do not hesitate to contact our office and speak to our program coordinator.

1. What is anonymous embryo donation?
2. Who can receive donated embryos?
3. How are donor embryos screened?
4. How much does it cost?
5. How do I know if receiving donated embryos is right for me?
6. What are the legal implications?
7. How do I get started?

 

1. What is anonymous embryo donation?

Embryo donation occurs when a patient or couple donates remaining embryos from a successful IVF cycle to another patient or couple, so that the recipients can have a baby of their own. The embryos are transferred to the recipient mother’s uterus. The resulting child is genetically related to the donors, yet is carried and raised by the recipient parents.

The Midwest Fertility Donated Embryo Adoption Program serves our patients in two important ways. For recipients, we are able to provide another family-building option to our fertility patients. For donors, we are able to provide our former IVF patients with a very special option for the disposition of their unused embryos.

 

2. Who can receive donated embryos?

Embryo recipients must be or have been patients at the Midwest Fertility Specialists. Your doctor will help you decide whether or not you are a good candidate. Embryo donation is a less expensive option than traditional IVF.

Patients who might consider embryo donation include those with male and female factor infertility, previous failed treatments, or very low chances of success with other fertility treatments.

 

3. How are donor embryos screened?

Donors are screened by our Embryo Donation Program team. In screening donors, we adhere to guidelines from the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. To determine if embryos are eligible for donation, the MFS team reviews the patient’s chart and the laboratory information to determine if the embryos can be offered to potential recipients.

Screening factors include patient’s psychological readiness to make a donation, family genetic history and age of the female donor. The egg donor’s age must have been 39 or younger at the time when the embryos developed.

Full screening includes:

  • Detailed review of health, medical history and fertility history
  • Detailed review of cycle characteristics and embryo quality
  • Screening laboratory tests to rule out presence of infectious diseases such as HIV, HTLV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, gonorrhea and chlamydia
  • Genetic screening for family history of birth defects or hereditary diseases via a comprehensive family history intake and assessment, if possible
  • Testing for blood type

We cannot guarantee the success of the thawing and transfer process, nor can we guarantee the health of any child that might result from the donation.

 

4. How much does it cost?

The cost for a donor embryo cycle is $7,125. Learn more about the details of these fees.

 

5. How do I know if receiving donated embryos is right for me?

Recipients and donors must understand that, someday, children born from embryo donation may want more information about their genealogy or genetic health history. In addition, some children may want to meet the donors and their families. It is important for recipient parents to consider how they might feel about these possibilities. Also, parents who do not share this information run the risk of their child finding out accidentally or from someone else.

Embryo donation is relatively new terrain, and there is much we still do not know about its long-term psychological, social and legal implications. While this is an ongoing area of active research, it is important for patients to enter the process as well informed as possible.

Both donors and recipients must understand that the recipients will be the parents of any child who may be born, even though the child will be genetically related to the donors. Children born from embryo donation will derive their innate traits from the donors, yet the recipients will raise the child, and thus will provide the nurturing environment in which the child will grow and develop.

 

6. What are the legal implications?

Donors sign a consent form stating that at the time of the transfer, they are relinquishing all rights and responsibilities regarding their embryos.

 

7. How do I get started?

First, you will need to contact our office to schedule a new patient appointment. After that, if you have identified donated embryos on our site, you should reserve them by placing a $3,225 deposit on this site. With a completed payment online, your selected embryos will be removed from the site immediately so that they cannot be reserved by anyone else.
To complete the reservation of your selected embryos, you will need to sign the donor embryo recipient consent forms.